Photographer Kasper Nyman celebrates his love of shooting hoops with series ‘Cities of Basketball’

Posted in Art, Photography, Sport
By Sam Bathe on 23 Jun 2016

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Shooting basketball courts from around the world, Danish photographer Kasper Nyman juxtaposes the sacred hoop against backdrops from the project blocks to the beach. Finding a commonality instead in the game on-court, his series Cities of Basketball celebrates the sport going back to its routes, and classic pick-up games against friends and fellow locals players. Show the rest of this post…

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Check out the rest of the series on the Cities of Basketball site: www.citiesofbasketball.com

Film Review: Alice Through the Looking Glass

Posted in Film, Illustration, Reviews
By Martin Roberts on 26 May 2016

Alice in Wonderland and Tim Burton seemed like a perfect match of source material and director, but the film that resulted in 2010 was a disappointment – lacking a sense of magic, and ultimately forgettable. Now, six years later, James Bobin (The Muppets) has brought us Alice Through the Looking Glass, a somewhat belated but, as it turns out, not unwelcome sequel. Show the rest of this post…

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This time around, Alice (Mia Wasikowska) must travel back to Wonderland (or ‘Underland’, as it was known in the first film) to try to snap the Mad Hatter (Johnny Depp) out of a depression brought on by an item he found in the forest, which lead to him to believe that his long-lost family, whom he thought dead, may actually be alive. To do this, Alice must employ the power of the Chronosphere, a device that will allow her to travel through time and revisit past events. In order to reach the Chronosphere, however, Alice must cross paths with Time himself, as personified by Sacha Baron Cohen.

The film succeeds where the previous one failed, in that it attempts to actually have a story, and to tell it. Where the first film got bogged down in a rambling mess of CGI, this sequel establishes that things are at stake, and although some of the backstory feels contrived, it is done well enough that the quest feels meaningful, and the finale can muster up some suspense.

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Thankfully, Bobin and screenwriter Linda Woolverton (improving hugely on her screenplay for the first one) give Mia Wasikowska more of a chance to make an impression, so it feels like Alice is actually important beyond people simply talking about her importance. Johnny Depp is still doing his baffling Mad Hatter performance and still treads a fine line between endearing, weird, and just plain annoying, but this time at least has some plot to work with. Most of the rest of the supporting cast return, primarily in tiny cameos, and thankfully Helena Bonham Carter gets to reprise her fun Red Queen role. As Time, Sacha Baron Cohen brings a mix of silliness and surprising weight, and although some of the character’s jokes aren’t really very funny (same goes for his little helpers), the character is well implemented, and his lair has some nice visual touches.

It still all feels a little unfocused and rambling, but this time much less so. There are contrivances in the story and  some of the performances still hover on the annoying side, but this sequel is surprisingly a better effort than its predecessor, with some fun action and inventive visuals to enjoy.

3/5

Christopher Payne’s new photo series, ‘Asylum’, is both haunting and mesmerising in equal measure

Posted in Art, Photography
By Sam Bathe on 9 May 2016

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Traveling to 30 US states to visit 70 mental hospitals, photographer Christopher Payne captures their haunting, eerie atmosphere in his new series, Asylum. As care practices shifted in the mid-20th century, populations of nearly half a million patients in 1948 declined rapidly over the following 30 years, meaning hundreds of insitutions now lie in total decay. Show the rest of this post…

For Christopher Payne, it was a photographer’s dream.

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Check out more of Christopher’s work on his site: www.chrispaynephoto.com

Portuguese llustrator Tiago Galo creates fun, little characters, with a twist in every scene

Posted in Art, Illustration
By Sam Bathe on 3 May 2016

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Learning his trade in small fanzines while finishing a degree in architecture at Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, illustrator Tiago Galo creates little, plump characters, almost ready to take on the Olympics. Always with something else going on, Tiago’s tongue-in-cheek humour in really clever and engaging, with his chunky creations leaping out at you from the screen. Show the rest of this post…

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Check out more of Tiago’s illustrations on his site: www.tiagogalo.com

Photographer Kourtney Roy shoots a fictional film noir in rural Canada for book ‘Northern Noir’

Posted in Art, Photography, Shoots, Style
By Sam Bathe on 19 Apr 2016

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Shot over several road trips through Ontario and British Columbia, photographer Kourtney Roy‘s series, Northern Noir, are like stills from a fictional film noir. Wanting to photograph the “non-events that encircle the places where transgressive acts may have taken place,” Kourtney creates a sinister undertone in otherwise mundane situations. The series is published in a book by Editions la Pionniere titled by the same name. Show the rest of this post…

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Check out more of Kourtney’s photography on her site: www.kourtneyroy.com

Ancient Transylvanian salt mine, Salina Turda, finds a new lease of life as a spectacular subterranean theme parkThe London List

By Sam Bathe on 12 Apr 2016

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In the picturesque Transylvanian countryside, Salina Turda is an ancient salt mine that has become a tourist attraction for unlikely reasons. Deep below ground, visitors descend the mine’s tight tunnels not only to experience the extraordinary man-made chamber below, but for subterranean mini-golf, bowling, and to row around its underground boating lake. Show the rest of this post…

Shot by photographer Richard John Seymour, the Salina Turda dates back over two millennia, last active as a salt mine in 1932. Since then it was used as a WWII shelter, for cheese storage, and in its modern form, now offers a healing centre for people suffering from lung conditions. Part of a €6m investment, a mini theme park with ferris wheels, plus a spa and small amphitheatre were all constructed as this man-made marvel starts a new life for tourists.

Salina Turda, Aleea Durgăului 7, Turda 401106, Romania
www.salinaturda.eu

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Brooklyn designer Dana Haim teams up with a fifth generation Mexican weaver for her debut rug collection

Posted in Art, Design
By Sam Bathe on 29 Mar 2016

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Designing wallpaper, jewelry, ceramics and pop-poms since graduating textile programs at the Rhode Island School of Design and Central Saint Martins, cross-disciplinary designer Dana Haim has turned her attention back to textiles. Teaming up with a fifth generation weaver in Oaxaca, Mexico, Haim’s debut collection of beautiful, naturally dyed rugs, boast geometric patterns that draw inspiration from classic kilim design. Available in four different designs with two colourways in each style, the rugs are available to buy from Haim’s personal website: www.danahaim.com

Photographer Daniel Müller captures Namibia on an amazing 1,500km, six-day road trip

Posted in Art, Photography
By Sam Bathe on 29 Feb 2016

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One of Africa’s most sparsely populated countries, Berlin-based photographer Daniel Müller took to the road in Namibia for Freunde von Freunden. From oyster farming on the Atlantic coast to the San tribesmen across the inland desert, it’s a country filled with character and culture so far beyond the captial of Windhoek. Show the rest of this post…

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Check out more of Daniel’s photography on his site: www.muellerdaniel.com

William Green captures the calmness and vulnerability of Tokyo taxi drivers sleeping in their cars

Posted in Art, Photography
By Sam Bathe on 22 Feb 2016

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In amongst the the hectic city life, for his latest project, photographer William Green captures a moment of silence, as Tokyo taxi drivers clock off for 40 winks in their cars. Show the rest of this post…

“I was in Japan working on a few other projects, and I stumbled upon them while doing a bit of pavement pounding,” Green explains, “I came across this one street – it’s not a taxi rank, but there were loads of people asleep.” After noticing the trend, he took his 35mm digital camera around the city to get some better shots, first asking permission from approaching a union rep.

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Check out more of William’s photography on his site: www.williamgreen.co.uk

Claudia Corrent captures the quiet, everyday life of a Venetian that you don’t normally see as a tourist

Posted in Art, Photography
By Sam Bathe on 4 Feb 2016

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Famous for it’s car free islands, instead dominated by beautiful water ways, Venice, Italy, is a sight to behold in the summer, but there’s one thing it isn’t; quiet. Italian photographer Claudia Corrent captures that side of Venice you don’t normally see for her series, Insulae. Documenting the everyday life of Venice’s local, her pastel-toned gaze gives the islands such a relaxing feel, it’s so easy to forget Piazza San Marco’s heaving streets in the summertime. Show the rest of this post…

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You can check out more of Claudia’s photography on here site: www.claudiacorrent.carbonmade.com

FAN THE FIRE is a digital magazine about lifestyle and creative culture. Launching back in 2005 as a digital publication about Sony’s PSP handheld games console, we’ve grown and evolved now covering the arts and lifestyle, architecture, design and travel.

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